4 Questions to Ask About Suboxone

4 Questions to Ask About Suboxone

If you have any questions regarding suboxone, you can talk to our professionals at Restoration Recovery. For more information call us or visit us online to book an appointment. We serve patients from Chattanooga TN, Tyner TN, Ridgeside TN, Harrison TN, East Ridge TN, Ooltewah TN, Red Bank TN, and surrounding areas.

Suboxone Clinic Near Me in Chattanooga, TN
Suboxone Clinic Near Me in Chattanooga, TN

Table of Contents:

How does suboxone work in the brain?
Does suboxone affect sleep?
How will I know if my suboxone dosage needs to be higher?
If I miss a dose of suboxone, what could happen?

How does suboxone work in the brain?


Suboxone is a combination of two medications, buprenorphine and naloxone, which work to relieve withdrawal symptoms during detoxification and aid in the recovery process. Buprenorphine is in the drug class of partial opioid agonists, while naloxone is an opioid antagonist.
 
These terms refer to their effect on the opioid receptors in the brain. Natural chemicals found in the brain, like endorphins and artificial chemicals such as oxycodone, bind to these opioid receptors to activate various chemical changes. These receptors primarily mediate pain and pleasure. Substances that bind to these receptors may be termed an agonist or antagonists.
 
An agonist activates the receptors, whereas an antagonist dampens the receptors’ functions. So, buprenorphine, the ingredient of Suboxone that is a partial agonist, will activate the opioid receptors in the brain, but not to the same severity that a full agonist would like morphine. In doing so, withdrawal symptoms are managed as the body’s chemical dependency is met but not furthered.
 
In contrast, naloxone, an opioid antagonist, blocks the effects of the receptor, so you do not experience the intoxicating effects of the drug. Together, these medications ensure that your body is not suffering from extreme opioid withdrawal as it would if the receptors were not being stimulated, while also negating the desired pain-relieving and pleasurable effects that make a patient emotionally dependent.

Does suboxone affect sleep?


Suboxone will likely affect your sleep, as the opioids you’ve previously taken have rewired parts of the brain and are no longer being used. It is common to see sleep disturbances in patients with opioid use disorder, typically insomnia. Withdrawal from opioids often worsens this symptom, and you must be in withdrawal to receive Suboxone treatment.

The purpose of this medication is to treat dependency and lessen withdrawal symptoms during detoxification. Relief from withdrawal will be seen in many areas, including sleep, so you can expect Suboxone to help you get some rest. Though rare, one potential side effect of Suboxone is worsened sleep disorders.

How will I know if my suboxone dosage needs to be higher?


When you begin suboxone treatments, the medication will be given by a healthcare provider, and you will be supervised for some time. You must be in moderate to severe withdrawal before taking this medication; otherwise, a condition termed precipitation withdrawal may occur.
 
In this instance, Suboxone will worsen your withdrawal symptoms significantly. Once your doctor has determined that this medication is appropriate, you will be given a low starting dose. Generally, the effects of Suboxone will be seen after twenty to forty-five minutes have passed. If you are not feeling relief after an hour, your physician will reassess your symptoms.
 
From there, they may provide a second dose, and you will be supervised for the same amount of time. Again, if you are not feeling relief after your second dose, your physician will reassess again and provide a third and final dose. The amount of medication given may increase each time, and you should feel better after the first day of starting this medication. The process of finding an adequate dose can take weeks, so you will be seeing your physician at regular intervals to ensure your needs are being met appropriately.

If I miss a dose of suboxone, what could happen?


Like many other medications, missing a dose or stopping abruptly can cause withdrawal symptoms, including nausea, vomiting, body aches, chills, headaches, sleep disturbances, sweating, irritability, etc. However, if you take your next scheduled dose, these withdrawal symptoms will begin to dissipate after a few hours.
 
Compared to methadone, another medication used to relieve opioid addiction, Suboxone has been reported to have less severe withdrawal symptoms.
 
Here at Restoration Recovery Addiction Treatment Center, we have a strong team of specialized healthcare providers that strive to aid you in your journey to improved health and a better quality of life. With an array of services and treatments available, including Suboxone, we ensure that this process will be more tolerable, and you will not be alone.
 
If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, please do not hesitate to reach out to our office; we will get you started on a healing path. Appointments can either be made over the phone or online at your convenience; we look forward to hearing from you. We serve patients from Chattanooga TN, Tyner TN, Ridgeside TN, Harrison TN, East Ridge TN, Ooltewah TN, Red Bank TN, and surrounding areas.